The Unquiet Dead
By:
Ausma Zehanat Khan
March 31, 2015
Reviewed by: Robin

This is a great debut mystery set in Canada and dealing with Bosnian war crimes. Detectives Essa Khattak and Rachel Getty are asked to look into what appears at first to be an accident. But as they uncover more details, find the victim may have been living under an assumed name and played a big role in the Srebrenica massacre of 1995.

We Are Pirates
By:
Daniel Handler
March 31, 2015
Reviewed by: Laura

Phil Needle just wants to keep his struggling production company afloat, but his bored, not-yet-permitted-to-use-public-transportation teenage daughter Gwen proves to be more challenging to manage. Her attempt at petty theft quickly spirals downward into full-blown modern-day piracy, complete with stolen ship and weaponry.

Demonologist
By:
Andrew Pyper
March 31, 2015
Reviewed by: Tonia

Thrown by his wife's sudden departure from their marriage, David whisks his daughter away to Venice in an effort to lift both of their moods, never imagining the horrors that await. An expert in demon mythology literature, in particular Milton's Paradise Lost, David must use his knowledge to follow clues from the tome to trace who has kidnapped his daughter in an ever maddening search not only for her, but his very soul.

I'll Give You the Sun
By:
Jandy Nelson
March 31, 2015
Reviewed by: Kris

Jandy Nelson’s I’ll Give You The Sun is quite easily one of my favorite books of 2014. I enjoy nonlinear storytelling. This book had a similar feel to We Were Liars and The First Part Last. Jude and Noah are twins. Both siblings are narrators. Noah’s voice explains the past while Jude is telling the story of the present. They both cross paths with various characters at different points in the story. The paths converge nicely at the end making this a satisfying read.

Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight
By:
Alexandra Fuller
March 31, 2015
Reviewed by: Chrissie

In Don’t Let’s Go to the Dogs tonight, Alexandra Fuller writes of her childhood in Africa with hard-drinking British parents. Fuller is straightforward while describing violence, malaria and mental illness, and her writing is perfectly lyrical. If you enjoy this one, check out Leaving Before the Rains Come, Fuller's latest memoir.