The Intern's Handbook
By:
Shane Kuhn
December 11, 2015
Reviewed by: Chrissie

John Lago is an expert hitman. High-powered business executives rely on interns, but barely pay them any attention, which is why Lago poses as an intern to get close to his targets. At twenty-five, he’s reaching retirement age, and The Intern’s Handbook details his last scheduled job.

Without You, There is No Us
By:
Suki Kim
November 16, 2015
Reviewed by: Chrissie

In the insightful book Without You There is No Us, Suki Kim chronicles her teaching experience in North Korea. She attempts to find out what the young men she teaches really know about North Korea’s relationship to the rest of the world without attracting attention from her handlers. This is a personal experience for Kim; her own family was separated during the Korean War. Kim’s account is insightful and packs an emotional punch.

The Book of Strange New Things
By:
Michel Faber
October 14, 2015
Reviewed by: Chrissie

The Book of Strange New Things takes place on two worlds. Peter is a missionary on a distant planet that is being colonized by a benevolent-seeming corporation while his wife is trying to survive an increasingly volatile Earth. Don’t expect explosions and war; the biggest conflicts in this book are quiet and internal, but no less powerful for that.

The Life and Death of Sophie Stark
By:
Anna North
September 18, 2015
Reviewed by: Chrissie

In this novel, filmmaker Sophie Stark is only described through the perspective of others. Some see her as a great artist, while others think she’s just selfish or weird. Get your friends to read this too so you can argue over how you see Sophie.

Without You, There is No Us
By:
Suki Kim
August 15, 2015
Reviewed by: Chrissie

In the insightful book Without You There is No Us, Suki Kim chronicles her teaching experience in North Korea. She attempts to find out what the young men she teaches really know about North Korea’s relationship to the rest of the world without attracting attention from her handlers. This is a personal experience for Kim; her own family was separated during the Korean War. Kim’s account is insightful and packs an emotional punch.

Once a Runner
By:
John L. Parker, Jr.
July 7, 2015
Reviewed by: Chrissie

Before this cult classic was reissued by a major publisher in 2009, you could buy a secondhand copy for hundreds of dollars. For many readers, the price was well worth it. The novel follows Quentin Cassidy, a runner full of heart, grit and humor as he trains to run a four-minute mile. If you’re a runner (and maybe if you’re not) you’ll find yourself lacing up your shoes after reading this one.

The Truth Commission
By:
Susan Juby
June 1, 2015
Reviewed by: Chrissie

You’ll enjoy reading about students in an experimental art school in The Truth Commission, a teen novel. A group of friends decide to find out the truth about their fellow students by asking them blunt questions. The questioning leads to some unexpected results, as you can imagine. This book is smart and funny, and doesn’t settle for easy endings.

Motherless Brooklyn
By:
Jonathan Lethem
May 5, 2015
Reviewed by: Chrissie

This comic detective tale follows Lionel Essrog as he tries to find his mentor's killer. Essrog is not a slick private eye; he's a relatively innocent, low-level gangster with Tourette's syndrome. In Motherless Brooklyn, Jonathan Lethem writes an ode to the familiar trope that's slightly off-kilter.

Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight
By:
Alexandra Fuller
March 31, 2015
Reviewed by: Chrissie

In Don’t Let’s Go to the Dogs tonight, Alexandra Fuller writes of her childhood in Africa with hard-drinking British parents. Fuller is straightforward while describing violence, malaria and mental illness, and her writing is perfectly lyrical. If you enjoy this one, check out Leaving Before the Rains Come, Fuller's latest memoir.